Posts Tagged ‘Writing tips’

I was checking out another horror writer’s site and I found that they, too, have a series of rules for their writing. I was very impressed with their set of rules and wanted to share it with you, so check it out:

Rules of Writing by Graham Masterton

I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.

1. GAUGE YOUR AUDIENCE. Don’t make your story too “easy” for older readers or too complex for younger ones. It is easy to get lost in the tell of the story and forget who you are telling it to, so it is very important to keep your reader in mind.

2. INTERESTING BEGINNING. Try to find a unique way to open your story. This opening needs to, at the very least, set the atmosphere of the story.

3. KNOW YOUR CHARACTERS. You should have a basic idea of your character, be it a name or an image, something that you can start off with. The more you know about your character(s), the more they come alive in your mind, and through your writing, in the mind of the reader.

4. KEEP THE STORY MOVING. The story needs vivid details in order to create a sense of reality within the reader. However, avoid becoming long-winded. Remember that you are telling a story and it must move forward.

5. THE END. A good story requires a good ending. Don’t try to draw the story out. Let it end where it needs to.

6. RELAX. You did a good job. Take a moment to catch your breath and pat yourself on the back. You have done what no one else in the world can do: you have written your story. Congratulate yourself.

Here is a tip for anyone who writes: If you are writing your first draft, never stop writing until you are finished. You will lose the drift that you have and be completely unsatisfied with what you come up with when you come back to it later.

Yep, you guessed it, I’ve done it. I found out my mistake when I tried to finish up Cleopatra’s Journal. So now I am very unhappy with the ending. I am currently toying with an ending remake. But there is one problem. I forgot how I wanted to end it, and that is how I got into this mess in the first place. My suggestion, never stop working on your first draft. Even if you only write a few sentences or a handful of words, never ever stop writing until the first draft is finished.

The good news is that I am starting to get the feeling I had when I first started writing it. How? By working through the posts, one day at a time. I know that it’s considered an edit, but it’s still reminding me of what I was doing.

One thing that will happen in a rewrite, or edit, is you will start to think you are the worst writer on the planet. Yep, I’m there, too. I know that there are better ways to write some scenes, only… I can’t think of them.

I am starting to think that first person is not my forte. I like writing in third person, which seems easier. First person, you have to stick with the one person, no matter what. Noticing what they notice, without doing the whole “I looked at so-n-so…” is one of the problems I am facing. I keep thinking I need to make my character notice it first. But then again, I am still in the edit where she is alone, so everything does focus on her. I know I have less of a problem when other people are involved.

Just to let you all know, my edit has gained another 2k words by the end of day 4. The opening, or what I think of as the prologue, to the story dropped three hundred words to boot. Of course, I’m thinking of dropping the intro completely, since everything is reiterated later on.

That’s it for the update. Wish me luck.

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Kristen Lamb's Blog

Image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of Tim Simpson. Image via Flickr Creative Commons, courtesy of Tim Simpson.

It’s been amazing and terrifying to watch the changes in our industry just over the past six years. For generations, there was only a handful of items a writer needed to do. Write a book. Query. Get an agent. Land a deal. Hopefully continue writing more books. Though this was far simpler, there was a horrific failure rate and most writers never saw their works in print.

In The Digital Age, we live in an exciting time. E-books have offered new life to many works that were simply a bad investment in the paper-based world (novellas, epic fantasy, poetry). Yet, with new opportunity comes new responsibilities.

We must understand the business side of our business. And, as someone who teaches at many conferences, I know that until recently it has been rare to find an in-person conference that offers training outside…

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This is absolutely fascinating if you are wanting to write seriously!

Kristen Lamb's Blog

Via Flickr Creative commons, courtesy of Tax Credits. Via Flickr Creative commons, courtesy of Tax Credits.

My degree is in Political Science with an emphasis on Political Economy. To earn this degree, I had to study a lot of statistics *UGH* and to be blunt? I agree with Mark Twain, “There are lies, damn lies and statistics.” Surveys and statistics are a science: number of participants, number of questions, phrasing of the questions, nature of the sample group, geography, etc.

Yada, yada, yada.

But somewhere in the numbers is some truth, which is why I asked one of our WANA instructors, Jami Gold, to do this guest post for me (and yes, she will be presenting at WANACon).

Sure we love to write, but I assume all of us are asking the BIG questions: Is there MONEY in writing? How do we make a GOOD living as writers? Money seems to be the taboo and we don’t want…

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Sorry for the short post. I finally wrote my final paper for one of my classes… took most of the last few days to write. I’ve been working hard on too many things. One of these days, I need to organize my schedule and not just let stuff happen. Anyway…. onward!

 

A couple of quotes that I like:

Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing. – Benjamin Franklin

When writing a novel a writer should create living people; people not characters. A character is a caricature. – Ernest Hemingway

 

Some more writing tips and links to inspire you.

99u: Insights on Making Ideas Happen 

Creative Writing Now

 

Hey guys,

This is just a quick post to share with y’all. A friend of mine recently entered a contest for creating the ultimate blog guide. There were a bunch of competitors and my friend won first place. I am really proud of him and hope that you all would show support for all the contest entries by viewing the pages. There is a lot of great info here, so it is actually worth the time spent to check it out!

Here is a list of all the competitors and their work: The Firepole Marketing Ultimate Guides Contest Winners!

And the winning contest entry: 99 Ways to Edit and Revise Anything You Write!

Enjoy!

Cat