Survival foods: Wild onions

Posted: March 26, 2014 by Rex Trulove in Survival, survival food, wild food
Tags: , , , , , , ,

There are many species of wild onions but they all have something in common with the store-bought variety: All of them are edible. Most wild onions don’t have hollow leaves like garden grown varieties, though. Instead, the grass-like leaves are flat, narrow and taper to a pointed tip.

Some species also lack a noticable bulb like domestic onions have, and they may have thick rhizomes instead. Like regular onions, however, both the leaves and the roots are edible, raw or cooked, and both have a distinct onion flavor and aroma when crushed. The scent is a major identifier for these wild plants, too. There are quite a few look-alikes, but none of those look-alikes smell like onion when a leaf is crushed. Most wild onions have blossoms that are varying shades of pink, sometimes so light that they appear almost white.

These plants grow from lowland to high altitude and in forests, river valleys and prairies.

Wild onions have about 64 calories per cupful, raw. They are high in vitamin C, vitamin B6, sulfur, calcium, phosphorus, iron, potassium and manganese. This is all good news for someone attempting to survive an apocalypse. They are even good for lowering cholesterol. After all, nobody said that you couldn’t survive and be healthy about it at the same time.

Medicinally, American Indian tribes used the juice to treat insect bites and to reduce swelling and puffiness. Cooking wild onions in a thick simple syrup or honey can be used to treat coughs and colds. The juice acts as a natural tonic, too. Like other members of the onion family, the juice is also an insect repellent, especially for biting insects such as mosquitoes, chiggers and ticks.

They can be cooked by simply chopping and adding to other foods, or by boiling or baking. The roots can also be dug up and used any time of the year if the survivalist knows where the wild onions are growing. The flavor is good enough that it can be used with fish, wild game or even grubs and other soft bodied invertebrates. Additionally, wild onions can be used to flavor other survival foods, especially those that are bland.Image

Like other survival plants, this is a good one to include in meals even if you are simply out camping.

Other survival foods: https://survivingthezombieapocolypse.wordpress.com/2014/03/23/survival-food-mallow-plant/

The picture of wild onion blossoms and buds is by George F Mayfield, creative commons share alike 2.0 generic attribution.

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