Catnip – Not Just for Cats

Posted: January 10, 2014 by Cat Reyes in Other Thoughts, Survival, Zombie
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Catnip photo: Catnip Catnip.jpg

Catnip is usually used for our feline companions as a way to entertain them and ourselves. I have to admit that I use it also as a training tool to get cats to scratch their posts, play with new toys, and use the liter box. However, humans can find uses for this plant as well.

The awesome thing about this plant is that it does grow wild, typically in drier places. It has heart-shaped leaves with ‘jagged’ edges and is a member of the mint family, so often is used in teas alongside the other mints.

According to Annie’s Remedy, “catnip leaves contain considerable quantities of vitamins C and E, both excellent antioxidants.” Catnip can be used for a bunch of things, most notably insomnia. Now, we all know that if you are being chased by zombies, taking a sleep inducer probably is not the best idea. However, if you have trouble falling asleep when you are in a safe place (usually with others who can watch your back) then this little plant can do wonders.

It can also be used for anxiety, to calm the body enough to think rationally. This can be extremely useful when you have a person who is easily excitable, or who will not calm down after rescue. Frankly, if they keep it up, you will have zombies beating down your door. And this is an easier method of calming a person down without knocking them out or flat out killing them.

Other uses include treatment for headaches, stomach upset, colds, flu, fever, hives, and menstrual cramping.

To dry, cut the stems and hang in a cool dry place. After they are dried, take the leaves from the stems and throw the stems away. You can just crumble them up and wrap them in a paper towel or a small bag to steep. Remember to use only 1 teaspoon of dried catnip. However, you do not need to use only dry catnip to make a tea. Take three teaspoons of fresh catnip and steep in warm water for about twenty minutes. Do not boil the catnip, because it will destroy many of the good vitamins in the plant. Only add the leaves after you pull the water from the heat and let sit for a few minutes.

This plant is great for use with kids and the elders of our society, especially in times of high stress. And you can add things to increase the flavor of the catnip, such as mint, lemon, lemon balm, and even cuts of fruit.

Now, I personally hate using sugar in teas. I truly believe that the chemicals used in sugar will destroy the various helpful affects of anything used in a tea. So I use honey. I also feel that the honey increases the potency of the herbs. However, I don’t know if any of this is proven. It’s just a personal choice. And one that I very highly recommend.

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Comments
  1. cb says:

    Must … Have … More … Cleopatra’s Journal …

    • Cat Reyes says:

      LOL. Really. I am still thinking on it. But just so you know, I am leaning more and more for just continuing here. This was what the novel was intended for. And this is, in a way, publishing it. I am more about having people read and enjoy, rather than making money (though to be honest, money would be a good thing – bills and stuff. LOL)

      • cb says:

        Seriously,

        Get a copy of John Scalzi’s

        You’re Not Fooling Anyone When You Take Your Laptop to a Coffee Shop: Scalzi on Writing (2007),

        Your Hate Mail Will Be Graded: A Decade of Whatever, 1998–2008 (2008),

        He is hilarious and does a great job of addressing getting into writing professionally.

        See also
        http://contrafactual.com/2013/07/09/john-scalzi/

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